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Financially Fit

The RAIN Method for Buying a Car

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The new year is right around the corner, which means this is the perfect time to be shopping for that “new year, new car” upgrade you have been waiting for. Whether you're looking for a brand new car or a reliable used ride, you want to get the most for your money. The process can be made easier by following the RAIN method: Research, Ask, Investigate, and Negotiate.

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The Payday Lending Trap

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Getting a loan with a payday lender could send you down a deep hole that may take years to get out of.

Here’s how payday lenders catch and hold consumers:

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One for the Money: Financing Your First Car

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Are you thinking about how you're going to pay for your first car? You could get it:

* As a gift or hand-me-down within your family
* With cash you earned from your job
* With an interest-free loan from your parents

But what if none of these options are open to you? You could get a loan. Here's how:

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Drive Off the Lot with Credit Union Financing

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Did you know you can get credit union financing--right at the car dealership?

The process is designed so credit union members benefit several ways.

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Understand Your Loan Options

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There are many different types of loans. So many, in fact, you may actually be overwhelmed. First, it is important to understand what credit unions look for and require when lending and then understand what options credit unions may have to meet your financial needs.

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What is a HELOC?

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A HELOC, or home equity line of credit, is a great tool that allows homeowners to borrow against the equity they have built up in their home, and use the proceeds to help cover expenses.  The following article will answer some common questions associated with HELOCs and its uses.

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Pros and Cons of Consolidating Student Loans

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Graduating college and earning a degree is certainly something worth celebrating.  Unfortunately, it isn’t always easy to celebrate right away when 70% of college graduates have substantial debt hanging over their heads.  The average college graduate takes on $40,000 of debt and 43% of graduated students in debt are either behind on their payments or simply not making them.  However, this debt usually is not coming from one loan and is rather coming from several loans that can vary in interest rate and payments.

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